Pregnancy
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      All About C-Section

      What is C-Section (Caesarean) and Who Needs It?

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      ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT C-SECTION

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      To help with your review, here's a run-down of Caesarean Section and why it is increasing in popularity today.

      IS IT COMMON?

      Global rate of caesarean birth is 21% while in Singapore, it is
      ~30%1

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      WHAT IS C-SECTION DELIVERY?

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      A caesarean section, also called a C-section is an operation to deliver the baby through the tummy when it is not possible or not advisable to deliver the baby through the vagina.2

      Some of us may know we need a C-section long before we give birth, but for others, the decision might not be made until they go into labour. If your doctor feels that a normal delivery will put you or your baby's health at risk, they may advise you to have a caesarean (C-section). Such reasons may include:

      1. EMERGENCY REASONS

      Any emergency medical reason, e.g. if the labour is not progressing as planned or if baby is not getting sufficient oxygen.

      2. BABY NOT IN HEAD DOWN POSITION

      If baby is not in a head-down position and all efforts to change position have not succeeded.

      3. TWINS OR MULTIPLE BIRTHS

      In case you are expecting twins or multiple babies, doctors might recommend surgery via caesarian section

      4. BASED ON PREVIOUS DELIVERY

      In case the previous vaginal delivery had been complicated or when previous delivery method was C-section.

      5. SMALL PELVIS

      If the mother's pelvis is too small in relation to baby's size.

      6. UNDERLYING MEDICAL CONDITIONS

      In case the previous vaginal delivery had been complicated or when previous delivery method was C-section.

      Source: Lancet Journal, Webmd.com, MOH

      WHAT HAPPENS DURING A C-SECTION?

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      HOW IS IT DONE?

      After anaesthesia, the doctor makes incisions in the abdomen and the uterus and removes the baby, placenta and does the stitchies. The procedure typically takes 45–60 minutes.3

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      INCISION MADE IN ABDOMEN

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      BABY REMOVAL

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      PLACENTA REMOVAL

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      CUT CLOSED WITH STITCHES

      Q: When should I start breastfeeding if I went for C-section delivery?

      A: After a C-section delivery, women are less likely to start breastfeeding in the first hour after the birth, but if they do start they are just as likely to continue breastfeeding as those who have a vaginal delivery.4


      Q: Will C-section pain go away?

      A: In the first 24 hours, there will be pain at the site of the incision. Thereafter, it may feel sore for a week or two. The symptoms will steadily get better as the incision heals and the uterus contracts.

       


      Q: If I had one previous C-section birth, can I have a vaginal delivery when I conceive C-section again?

      A: Women who have had one previous uncomplicated lower segment C-section delivery and no other problems in the current pregnancy are suitable candidates for Vaginal delivery.5

      There are, however, several factors to consider:

      – The previous C-section
      – Current pregnancy
      – Other medical or surgical problems

      Your doctor will be in a better position to assess your suitability.

       


      Q: What is the chance of a successful Vaginal Birth After C-Section (VBAC)?

      A: The chance of a successful VBAC resulting in a natural delivery may be up to 60–70%. This is generally higher for women who have had previous successful vaginal deliveries.5

       

      Be sure to include your thoughts about having C-section delivery in your birth plan. During your last few appointments before baby arrives, your doctor will check your baby's position in your womb, so do not skip these scheduled meetings!

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      Choosing between Natural and C-Section Delivery

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      Choosing between Natural and C-Section Delivery

      Check out our infographic on cost comparisons for different delivery methods across wards in Singapore and more.

      Read more

      Recovery after C-Section Childbirth

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      Recovery after C-Section Childbirth

      Though C-section would take just about an hour, you'll need a longer recovery period ocmpared to natural births. Here are tips for a faster recovery.

      Read more